Undersea Cables Vulnerable to Terrorist Attack?

Dr. Munr Kazmir
4 min readFeb 27, 2024

A Houthi attack on undersea cables has exposed a terrible vulnerability.

KAUAI, Hawaii (July 5, 2016) Chief Construction Electrician Daniel Luberto, right, and Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Andersen Gardner, with Underwater Construction Team 2 Construction Dive Detachment Bravo (UCT2 CDDB), remove corroded zinc anodes from an undersea cable at the Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands, Hawaii. UCT2 CDDB is assigned to the 30th Naval Construction Regiment under Commander, Task Force (CTF) 75, the primary expeditionary task force responsible for the planning and execution of coastal riverine operations, explosive ordnance disposal, diving, engineering and construction, and underwater construction in the U.S. 7th fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy combat camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Charles E. White/Released)

Houthis knock out underwater cables linking Europe to Asia — report,” the Jerusalem Post revealed over the weekend.

“The successful targeting of the four cables, which are believed to belong to the AAE-1, Seacom, EIG, and TGN systems, marks a serious disruption of communications between Europe and Asia,” wrote the Jerusalem Post staff.

These cables are extremely important access and communication conduits — and can cost more than $10 million to fix.

“Yemen’s Iranian-backed Houthi movement, which is not the internationally recognized government of the Arab country but which controls its most populous segments, has been attacking international trade for months, proclaiming solidarity with Palestinians as Israel wages war against Hamas in the Gaza Strip,” noted the Jerusalem Post.

This troubling development is only the latest sign of a deepening crisis in the Middle East.

Houthis Attack U.S. Warship as China Urges Iran to Rein In Rebels,” reported Nancy A. Youssef for the Wall Street Journal last month.

“The Marlin Luanda, a fuel tanker sailing on behalf of trading giant Trafigura Group, was struck by a missile in the Gulf of Aden, in one of the most significant attacks yet by Yemen’s Houthi rebels on an oil-carrying vessel,” noted Youssef.

“In conversations in Tehran and Beijing, Chinese officials asked their Iranian counterparts to rein in their Yemeni ally, an Iranian official and an Iranian government adviser said,” she continued. “Iran officials told the Chinese that they weren’t in control of the group and that turmoil in the region would end if Israel agreed to a cease-fire, the Iranians said.”

Israel has, of course, already offered a cease-fire, which was subsequently rejected by Hamas leadership. Buoyed by the success of its October 7 terrorist attack against Israeli citizens and the widespread support the group has achieved — perversely — despite it, Hamas leaders have publicly vowed to launch more such attacks.

Now, rather than demanding a ceasefire — as they have been doing, without advocating for the release of Israeli citizens who…

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