Someone is Selling Transcendental Politics this Election Season

Dr. Munr Kazmir
5 min readDec 22, 2019

And it isn’t Democrats.

A member of the audience stands to watch President Donald J. Trump address his remarks Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, at Turning Point USA’s 5th annual Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

When politicians are engaged in a fierce campaign competition against their political opposition in a fight to career death, they go ahead and reach for the stars. There is a very good reason for this.

Voters love that sort of thing, as any politician worth his salt knows.

Millions of people play the lottery, after all; because hope springs eternal. After the election, voters know, it’s always time to come back down to earth. Just like lotto players who know in their hearts that their next scratch-off isn’t likely to net them millions, voters know their favorite candidate is likely to disappoint them.

Just like they know their “lesser of two evils” candidate is almost contractually obligated to disappoint them even more.

President Donald J. Trump addresses his remarks Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, at Turning Point USA’s 5th annual Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

Each and every person elected to higher office arrives with a certain set of skills, including the ability to sell pure blue-sky promises that have been broken a million times before by a million other politicians- somehow- for campaign donations. Most have a communication style at least charismatic enough to get themselves elected.

Meaning? Everyone in the political field elected to higher office can talk a good game; they wouldn’t be there otherwise. Anyone can wax poetic about everything they would fix about America if they ruled the world, for a change.

Of those, few have the intestinal fortitude for politics; the campaign trail is grueling, the pressure is enormous, it requires great sacrifice of time, money and privacy. Fewer people still have the unique set of personal and professional skills necessary to be a successful lawmaker. Even fewer care to hold public office for fear of the scrutiny such a position would invite into their personal lives.

Of those left, the ability of convince people of things they really ought to know better than to believe is that essential “It” factor, that final nebulous element that separates the Spiro Agnews from the John F. Kennedys.

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